Hamilton-Turner Inn

4 stars
330 ABERCORN STREET, SAVANNAH, GA 31401
Hamilton-Turner Inn

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Property Description

This bed and breakfast is located in Savannah's Historic District on Lafayette Square. The inn offers a full Southern breakfast and unique guest rooms with free Wi-Fi.Hamilton-Turner Inn features full concierge services and a free DVD movie library. Afternoon tea and evening wine and hors d'oeuvres are available in the parlor.Guest rooms at the Hamilton-Turner Inn include designer bath amenities and bathrobes. MP3 docking stations are also provided in each room.Guests at the Hamilton-Turner Inn Savannah can take a carriage tour of the Historic District. Tybee Island, known for its beaches, is a 20-minute drive from the inn. ...read more

Centrally located in Savannah, this property is near Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Calhoun Square, and Savannah College of Art and Design. Another attraction in the area is Forsyth Park. Hamilton-Turner Inn offers a complimentary breakfast and reception to guests. Other amenities include a garden, complimentary parking, and business services. Guestrooms have DVD players, CD players, and complimentary wireless Internet access; bathrooms include shower/tub combinations, bathrobes, and designer toiletries.

Impressive in workmanship and size, the park-side mansion was built in 1873 for Samuel Pugh Hamilton and his family. Mr. Hamilton was a successful businessman and prominent Savannah citizen and alderman. He and his wife, Sarah V. Hamilton, created a social center for Savannahs elite, hosting a variety of society activities in their home. The Hamilton mansion was the first residence in Savannah with electricity. In 1883 electric lights were installed in the salon. Spectators witnessing the inaugural room lighting feared the house would explode. The entire house was fitted with electric lights by 1886. It was no coincidence that the illustrious Samuel Hamilton became the President of the Brush Electric Light & Power Company around the same time his prestigious mansion was illuminated, encouraging the acceptance of the invention. Because of the Hamilton mansions tin roof, it withstood the Savannah fire of 1898. All of the homes on Lafayette Square survived the fire due to their heat resistant roofing. A neighbor on the square, St. John the Baptist Cathedralcompleted the same year as the Hamilton mansionwas not as fortunate. In 1915 Dr. Francis Turner purchased the house from the Hamilton estate. He and his family lived there until 1926, when they opened the house up for boarding. The mansion became a home for the Marine Hospital nurses in 1928. The Turner family moved back to the mansion in the 1940s, and the basement of the house served as office space for Dr. Turners practice. Dr. Turner was known by neighbors as an electric car enthusiast, preferring electric to the noise and smell of gas cars. The Turner family sold the house to the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in 1965. The Cathedral purchased the property to provide a playground for their school, nearby. Once this plan published, the Historic Savannah Foundation began petitioning to save the house from demolition. After years of negotiations the mansion was saved from destruction in the late 1960s by the Historic Savannah Association, a non-profit organization founded in 1955 to protect endangered buildings in Savannahs historic district. Over the next 30 years the Hamilton-Turner Houseunder several owners and managementwas an apartment building. The house was embroiled in scandal under the management of Joe Odom. His raucous partiesmade famous through the John Berendt book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Eviltroubled neighbors on Lafayette Square. The Hamilton-Turner mansion was converted into a bed and breakfast in 1997 by Charlie and Sue Strickland. The Hamilton-Turner Inn restoration and preservation passed to Rob and Jane Sales in February of 2003. The present owners Gay and Jim Dunlop take seriously the task of continuing the legacy of maintaining and upgrading this fine historic building in cooperation with the Historic Savannah Foundation. As long time Innkeepers, the Dunlops plan to put their experience to good use, over the next three years, investing a considerable amount to do necessary restoration to the building, returning The Hamilton-Turner Inn to its original grandeur.

Impressive in workmanship and size, the park-side mansion was built in 1873 for Samuel Pugh Hamilton and his family. Mr. Hamilton was a successful businessman and prominent Savannah citizen and alderman. He and his wife, Sarah V. Hamilton, created a social center for Savannahs elite, hosting a variety of society activities in their home. The Hamilton mansion was the first residence in Savannah with electricity. In 1883 electric lights were installed in the salon. Spectators witnessing the inaugural room lighting feared the house would explode. The entire house was fitted with electric lights by 1886. It was no coincidence that the illustrious Samuel Hamilton became the President of the Brush Electric Light & Power Company around the same time his prestigious mansion was illuminated, encouraging the acceptance of the invention. Because of the Hamilton mansions tin roof, it withstood the Savannah fire of 1898. All of the homes on Lafayette Square survived the fire due to their heat resistant roofing. A neighbor on the square, St. John the Baptist Cathedralcompleted the same year as the Hamilton mansionwas not as fortunate. In 1915 Dr. Francis Turner purchased the house from the Hamilton estate. He and his family lived there until 1926, when they opened the house up for boarding. The mansion became a home for the Marine Hospital nurses in 1928. The Turner family moved back to the mansion in the 1940s, and the basement of the house served as office space for Dr. Turners practice. Dr. Turner was known by neighbors as an electric car enthusiast, preferring electric to the noise and smell of gas cars. The Turner family sold the house to the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in 1965. The Cathedral purchased the property to provide a playground for their school, nearby. Once this plan published, the Historic Savannah Foundation began petitioning to save the house from demolition. After years of negotiations the mansion was saved from destruction in the late 1960s by the Historic Savannah Association, a non-profit organization founded in 1955 to protect endangered buildings in Savannahs historic district. Over the next 30 years the Hamilton-Turner Houseunder several owners and managementwas an apartment building. The house was embroiled in scandal under the management of Joe Odom. His raucous partiesmade famous through the John Berendt book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Eviltroubled neighbors on Lafayette Square. The Hamilton-Turner mansion was converted into a bed and breakfast in 1997 by Charlie and Sue Strickland. The Hamilton-Turner Inn restoration and preservation passed to Rob and Jane Sales in February of 2003. The present owners Gay and Jim Dunlop take seriously the task of continuing the legacy of maintaining and upgrading this fine historic building in cooperation with the Historic Savannah Foundation. As long time Innkeepers, the Dunlops plan to put their experience to good use, over the next three years, investing a considerable amount to do necessary restoration to the building, returning The Hamilton-Turner Inn to its original grandeur.

This handsome French Second Empire building was constructed in 1873 by the founder of the Hamilton Watch Company, who also happened to be mayor of Savannah. Outfitted with somewhat heavy handed Victorian accents, the decor is a bit crowded and busy, but the inn operates efficiently and provides all the modern conveniences, such as phones and VCRs in every guestroom. Located on the fringes of the Historic District, the property is convenient to most area attractions and many fine restaurants.

Nestled on picturesque Lafayette Square, the Hamilton-Turner Inn is ideally situated in the center of Savannah's beautiful historic district for discovering all the secrets of Savannah. Savannah's stately Second Empire mansion, built in 1873, combines Southern charm with luxurious accommodations and an array of amenities. The guests can wake each morning to a gourmet southern breakfast in the charming dining room. Savor complimentary early evening wine and hors d'oeuvres and late evening port in the relaxing parlor, and delight in bedtime turndown service of freshly baked cookies. With expert concierge service at the ready to offer recommendations for exploring this historic city, this Savannah bed and breakfast makes a perfect home base for an inspired stay. The guest can enjoy one of the 17 guestrooms or suites, each with its own private bath. The guests can choose from grand suites overlooking the moss-draped oaks and fountain of the square, garden-view courtyard accommodations with private entrances, spacious, individually appointed rooms and three clustered carriage house rooms. Some accommodations offer fireplaces, whirlpool spa baths, claw-footed baths, and bay window views of the park. The Inn has been featured in Southern Living, American Eagle Latitudes, Food Network, U.S. Airways Attache, and Esquire.

Location. This city-center property is located in Savannah, close to Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and Calhoun Square. Also nearby are Savannah College of Art and Design and Forsyth Park. Features. In addition to tour/ticket assistance and a garden, Hamilton-Turner Inn features a media library and a fireplace in the lobby. Business amenities include complimentary wireless Internet access, meeting rooms for small groups, and business services. Guests are offered a complimentary breakfast and reception. Guest parking is complimentary. The staff can arrange concierge services. Additional amenities include coffee in the lobby, air conditioning in public areas, and self parking. The front desk is open during limited hours. This is a smoke-free property (fines may apply for violations). Guestrooms. Amenities featured in guestrooms include DVD players, air conditioning, and complimentary bottled water. Turndown service is offered on request. Guestrooms have televisions with premium TV channels, HBO, and ESPN. Business-friendly amenities include complimentary wireless Internet access, direct-dial phones, and voice mail. Each guestroom features unique furnishings. Bathrooms feature shower/tub combinations, bathrobes, and designer toiletries. Guestroom services include a turndown service and housekeeping. All guestrooms at Hamilton-Turner Inn are non-smoking. Notifications: Guests must be at least 21 years old to check in at this property. Cribs (infant beds) are not available. Guests departing prior to their scheduled departure date may be subject to an early departure fee. Onsite parking is free for guests only for the duration of their stay. Additional fees and deposits may be charged by the property at time of service, check-in, or check-out. Pets: US$ 50 per stay, maximum US$ 50 per stay

Hotel Rooms: 17.

Amenities
  • Parking
  • Internet Access
  • Fitness Center
  • Pool
  • Dining
  • Pets
  • Room Service
  • Meeting Room